Fri. Dec 6th, 2019

Oxford Big Project

Business Project

Chocolate Enrobing: How it Works

2 min read

Whether you are enrobing chips, fresh fruit, caramel, nougat, and other products, the enrobing process will protect the candy from the air, lock moisture inside, and help maintain its shape. Also, enrobing provides the candy with extra dimension and you can add flavor and character to it. What to enrobe your candy in depends on the flavors you wish to put into the truffles and your taste. A chocolate enrobing machine will speed up the entire enrobing process.

Enrobing In Fine Tempered Chocolate

Enrobing in fine tempered chocolate is called couverture. With a couverture, a greater percentage of the chocolate’s overall fast is cocoa butter. While you can enrobe with other chocolates, you may not achieve the same quality taste, snap, glossy sheen, or mouth-feel at the end. Although it takes a bit more effort, the benefits are obvious. First, the candy is locked in an airtight chocolate shell and last a little longer. But, you still need to keep the finished product in a cool, dry place like an airtight container.

Chocolate enrobing lets you decorate in a lot of ways. Although you still come up with soft chocolate, you can press in candied nuts or a coffee bean. You can also cut and place gold and silver flake sheets on top or decorate with candy paint.

Enrobing the BonBon

You need to prepare the filling first. Whether you have a nut, fruit, or ganache filling, get your candy prepared which could mean cutting after slabbing, molding, and balling. Then, cover it. If you are using nuts, sprinkles, or powder, roll the candy around and press the covering material into the candy. Your hands’ heat will soften the exterior of the candy and make it a little stickier. If you prefer to enrobe in chocolate, you need to temper enough to cover the batch of candy.

You can apply the tempered couverture to the candy treats in many ways. The method to use depends on the shape you want the final product to take. The majority of professional chocolatiers will enrobe and decorate a kind of filling the same way as a means of determining what’s inside. A lot of chocolatiers place a dollop of tempered chocolate into the palm and roll the candy filling around the hand to coat it. After covering the truffle, it is placed on a silicon rubber mat or parchment paper to firm up. Hand enrobing works only when producing small batches for chocolates but industrial production requires the use of state-of-the-art enrobing machines.